https://rajpub.com/index.php/jaa/issue/feed JOURNAL OF ADVANCES IN AGRICULTURE 2021-02-14T14:05:08+00:00 Editorial Office editor@rajpub.com Open Journal Systems https://rajpub.com/index.php/jaa/article/view/8950 Using Quinclorac to Control Annual Grasses and Palmer Amaranth in Grain Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) 2021-01-15T14:22:18+00:00 James Grichar w-grichar@tamu.edu Travis Janak travisj@bhgenetics.com <p>Field studies were conducted during the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons in south-central Texas to determine control of Palmer amaranth and annual grasses along with grain sorghum tolerance to quinclorac alone and in various combinations when applied to weeds &lt; 5 cm (EPOST) or 10 to 16 cm tall (LPOST). When evaluated late-season quinclorac alone at 0.43 kg ae ha<sup>-1</sup> controlled broadleaf signalgrass 72% when applied EPOST and 91% when applied LPOST. Combinations of quinclorac with either atrazine, pyrasulfotole + bromoxynil, dicamba, or dimethenamid-P controlled Palmer amaranth 88 to 100% when applied EPOST or LPOST; however, broadleaf signalgrass control with these combination was better when applied LPOST (75 to 95%) compared with EPOST (37 to 72%) applications. Texas millet control with quinclorac was poor in both years and was never greater than 54%. Quinclorac plus either atrazine, pyrasulfotole + bromoxynil, dicamba, or atrazine + dimethenamid-P caused at least 20% sorghum injury at one of three locations. No yield reductions from the untreated check were noted in either year; however, in 2016 all treatments with the exception of quinclorac alone at 0.29 kg ha<sup>-1</sup> applied EPOST, quinclorac + pyrasulfotole + bromoxynil applied LPOST, quinclorac + atrazine + pyrasulfotole + bromoxynil applied LPOST, and quinclorac + dicamba at either application timing produced yields that were greater than the untreated check.</p> 2021-02-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2021 James Grichar, Travis Janak